GATEWAY PROJECT: A FULBRIGHT BLOG





WELCOME / 欢迎


This blog is an archive for my research, interviews with designers and museum staff, and travel experiences as I explore multilingual design practices in Taiwan and the US.
Fulbright research abroad in Taipei, Taiwan began in March 2021.   

这个博客是关于我个人在旅行交流经验中用中英文做研究访问博物馆陈列设计师和员工的记录。

2021年三月到輔仁大學开始我富布赖特的国外研究。




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TALKING POINT: NEURAL MACHINE TECHNOLOGY





Language: English
Date: June 15, 2021
Listening to: Tidal Wave by the Moutain Goats


 
A major road block in implementing multilingual exhibitions is the high cost of professional translation services. In order to keep up with the demands of a global economy, major corporations are able to invest into setting up international offices, translating their websites, and releasing packaging to fit different cultural sensibilities. It takes an enormous amount of resources to retain an international audience - something that non-profit, overextended museums rarely have room for in the budget. A common complaint is that professional translation services are expensive* and waiting for the final drafts of bilingual signage can confuse the flow of exhibition design process. A promising advancement in machine translation technology could change this imbalance in our lifetime and open up a post-language economy. 

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TALKING POINT: MUSEUM DIPLOMACY 





Language: English
Date: May 16, 2021
Listening to: Streets of Philadelphia by Bruce Springsteen


 
This month I did something that I haven’t done since I started checking my emails every day and news feeds even more often: reading a book in just a day. The book that managed to break through my device’s stranglehold was “Global Trends in Museum Diplomacy: Post-Guggenheim Developments” by Natalia Grincheva. I was surprised to find that academic title hid a riveting deep dive into “the transformation of museums from publicly or privately funded heritage institutions into active players in the economic sector of culture.” This book made me reconsider my own assumptions about the role of museums and my own role as a Fulbright Scholar as non-state actors in international diplomacy. 

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REFLECTION: 自我介紹





Language: 中文
Date: 2021年5月3號
Listening to:
萬妮達 Vinida -《SOLO獨行者》



 

各位老師、各位同學,大家好。我是蘭心,來自美國- 我因為拿到了一份國際上重要的研究獎學金叫Fulbright,所以來到台灣,現在是輔大的访问學者。讓我很快地告訴你們一些关于我自己的小事。 我是在賓夕法尼亞州長大的,然後我畢業於弗吉尼亞大學VCU。 我從高中開始學習中文,之前曾經去過中國學習。 這是我第一次來台灣,我已經愛上很多台灣的事物,比如說:台灣人很熱情,食物真好吃,捷運又便宜又方便!


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TALKING POINT: LANGUAGE BARRIERS





Language: English
Date: April 23, 2021
Listening to: “Hypotheticals” by Lake Street Dive


 
What do Subway and a Catholic church have in common? (Aside from the fact that in the most simplified version of each, it’s all about the bread.)

Subways and Catholic churches are places where language barriers are particularly thin. Even if you do not speak a word of the local dialect but you have a prior knowledge of the expected performance in these places, you will be able to follow along because the exact same words and actions happen every time you go. A Subway employee asking me if I wanted a taco would be equally surprising as a dance break being added to a Catholic Mass. It makes sense then that when I was recovering from a recent sickness in Taiwan I sought out both of these places for a sense of comfort. There are many other examples of places with thin or nonexistent language barriers that are important to the daily life of immigrants, tourists, and culture-shocked exchange students alike because of the temporary relief offered from the pressure of existing in an unfamiliar place. 

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REFLECTION: POST-COVID CULTURE SHOCK





Language: English
Date: April 11, 2021
Listening to: “Shangri-La” by EOB
The normal progression of culture shock has some unexpected twists thanks to the effects of traveling post COVID. The original structures of old comfort and new strangeness that drive the culture shock bell chart have been flipped upside down by the fact that life at home isn’t even normal. Since this is my fourth time visiting East Asia, I thought I was ready for the homesickness. Instead, it’s the worst its ever been…which is strange because if you’ve been living the same socially distanced American life that I have been the past year, you know it’s not enviable at all. So why is my homesickness so overpowering?

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