GATEWAY PROJECT: A FULBRIGHT BLOG





WELCOME / 欢迎


This blog is an archive for my research, interviews with designers and museum staff, and travel experiences as I explore multilingual design practices in Taiwan and the US.
Fulbright research abroad in Taipei, Taiwan began in March 2021.   

这个博客是关于我个人在旅行交流经验中用中英文做研究访问博物馆陈列设计师和员工的记录。

2021年三月到輔仁大學开始我富布赖特的国外研究。




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ESSAY SERIES: THE FIRST PUBLIC MUSEUM





Language: English
Date: Sept 17, 2021
Listening to: Survivor by 

Nathaniel Rateliff & The Night Sweats


 
THE ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM (1683)

In 17th century Europe, where could you go to see cultural artifacts, new medical treatments, and mystical objects from faraway lands? You would have to know a guy… and most likely be a guy. European colonization of Asia and the New World  created a demand for “exotic” objects that flowed into the private homes of wealthy, educated men. Curio cabinets were a sign of wealth and gentlemanly scholarship, as it was in vogue to be familiar with many scientific disciplines. The most popular scholarships were natural history, medicine, mathematics, alchemy, astrology and magic. An upperclass sub-culture sprung up around acquiring valuable “rarities” and then welcoming friends and scholars into your house to tour the collection (Ntoulia). When the Ashmolean Museum opened its collection of rarities to the public in 1683, it set into motion museum practices that continue to echo in our contemporary institutions.


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